Making Reflection behave like PuTTY

Around 14 years ago, I switched from using Reflection to PuTTY because it was free and my employer at the time wouldn’t pay for such extravagance software purchases such as a simple terminal emulator! Since then I’ve become rather accustomed to the way PuTTY behaves, and find Reflections particularly annoying to use on the occasion that I visit a client who insists on using it. However, it is possible to solve most of the biggest annoyances…

Kornshell function declarations

Over the years I have seen and maintained many kornshell scripts written by DBAs, and there are a number of programming styles that provoke strong reactions on who is doing it the "right" way. In this article, I will explain the different ways in which functions can be defined in Kornshell and explain why I personally prefer one method over another.

TNS Configuration files – Search order

Oracle clients (and programs that use Oracle clients/drivers) will search for TNS configuration files such as sqlnet.ora and tnsnames.ora in the following order. Note that the first file to be found will be used -- so if there were files in both location 3 and location 5, then the one in location 3 would be found first... Continue Reading →

Continue SCP’ing file(s) after log out

The unix command scp is very useful for transferring files between two hosts over a secure connection, but sometimes you need to kick off an scp command that will take several hours to complete and you want to disconnect and go home. Using "screen" One approach is to use the screen command (available only on linux AFAIK) to start the initial transfer, then... Continue Reading →

Kornshell function to keep revisions of a file

Sometimes while developing scripts you want to keep backups of certain files, but are worried that over time the old versions will fill the filesystem and need housekeeping. The following function will allow you to keep only <n> versions of a file (the default is 5 backups) with older ones getting removed automatically.  # Usage:... Continue Reading →

Using Quick I/O files with Oracle

VERITAS Quick I/O supports direct I/O and allows databases to access regular files on a VxFS file system as raw character devices. The benefits for Oracle databases are improved perofmrance (closer to raw devices) with the ability to manage Quick I/O files as regular files. Quick I/O's ability to access regular files as raw devices improves database performance by supporting direct I/O, avoiding kernel write locks on database files and avoiding double buffering.

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑