Using older Fujitsu ScanSnap scanners with Windows 10

A number of older ScanSnap scanners released by Fujitsu are no longer supported and the official line from Fujitsu is to buy new hardware. However, the ScanSnap range isn't cheap and you can avoid spending a large sum by utilizing Compatibility Mode built into Windows to get your older scanner working with the latest versions of Windows. This guide will show you how.

Dot Underscore ._ files in Dropbox

Recently, all my files stored in Dropbox suddenly acquired a "dot underscore" file in addition to the original file, which was then synced to all other computers that were linked to my Dropbox account. This post describes what these files are, and how I resolved the issue.

Fixing the cursor keys in OS X for Windows users

I'm a longtime Windows user who recently purchased a Mac. Overall I'm very impressed with the machine, but it does have a learning curve, especially for the key bindings. As a DBA and¬†programmer, I use the Home, End, PageUp,¬†PageDown and CTRL keys extensively to quickly navigate code and text documents. And don't get me started... Continue Reading →

Reflect for Evernote – reviewing your notes in bitesize chunks

One of the most powerful features of Evernote is how quickly and easily you can add content to your notebooks. Sometimes however, this is both a blessing and a curse because there is no review process for removing old and outdated notes. Sometimes you come across a note that could do with more context around it as the original reason for writing/clipping it was not recorded at the time. Well luckily, there is now a nice neat solution for reviewing your notes.

MS Word: F3 != Find Next

I don't know about anyone else, but I find it incredibly annoying that the Microsoft Word doesn't use F3 as the shortcut key for finding the next occurrence of something that you have previously searched for. Here's the correct (i.e. out of the box) shortcut for finding the next occurrence and how to change it to F3 in Word 2007 and above.

Logging PuTTY sessions

As a DBA, it is generally a good idea to log all your activity when working on Unix/Linux servers. Logging provides an audit of changes that you have made to a system as well as being a valuable resource for notes and documentation. This article describes how to log all PuTTY sessions and how to automtically maintain the resulting logfiles in a logical directory structure.

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